How long have you been playing?

chris_is_cool

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I tried starting to play in 2019, mostly just fucking around and playing by tabs, and quit after 3 months... Then 1 year later I started again when covid hit and been at it with structure ever since. So in total, I have a playtime of about a year, but I usually say I've been playing for 9 months now. I didn't even know any open chords or strumming patterns when I started again this year, so I can't really honestly count the first try. I have a buddy who is also still a beginner, and we jam together sometimes, and I got a private teacher as well, and it helped speeding up my progress by a lot, I would say.

I'm definitely still very much a beginner, but I would say my theory knowledge is so far my strongest point (quite the opposite of most replies :ROFLMAO: ). I had trumpet lessons for about 5 years or so when I was a kid, so I was fluent in standard notation and sight reading, and learned my circle of fifths, and it really really really helped. The major and natural minor were the first scales I looked up for guitar, didn't really care for pentatonics (and still much prefer diatonic to pentatonic scales xD), and I swallowed up all about theory I could find since I joined this site.

Anyway, one of my motivations is definitely playing in a metal band in the future. I also wanna do a guitar heavy synth wave project, in the direction of Dance with the Dead etc... So my motivation to progress and learn more is as high as it gets.😁
 

Andy Schultz

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Thanks for the replys. One thing I want to say to everyone that's saying they're learning theory, GO BUY A KEYBOARD. It doesn't have to be good, seriously the little Casio keyboard so many people have as a kid would even work. The way the notes are laid out in sequence on a keyboard makes intervals, scales, arpeggios, build chords, really anything that's not rhythm related so much easier to understand than a guitar. I'm not saying learn to play the keyboard just learn where the notes are to understand theory concepts, then move them over to guitar. It was a night and day difference for me in understanding theory.
Yes! This! I've been playing for 25 years, and I've only been learning theory recently. It wasn't until I got a keyboard that it made more sense to me. I'll admit that I never put the dedication to learning theory as I did to learn guitar (bit of a regret). Life seems to get in the way of the focus. Better late than never.
I did quite a lot of gigging in the early 2000's but not in the last ten years. Looking to get something going in the next year or so.
 
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Ids Schiere

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What's diatonic, first time hearing it :D
Diatonic is your regular major scale.

A diatonic scale is a heptatonic scale that includes five whole steps (whole tones) and two half steps (semitones) in each octave, in which the two half steps are separated from each other by either two or three whole steps, depending on their position in the scale.

Personally I don't care for the technicalities of how much and I'll probably forget the exact meaning instantly. If you know a diatonic scale refers to a natural major scale and it's notes it's good enough.
 

William B.

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    Diatonic is your regular major scale.

    A diatonic scale is a heptatonic scale that includes five whole steps (whole tones) and two half steps (semitones) in each octave, in which the two half steps are separated from each other by either two or three whole steps, depending on their position in the scale.

    Personally I don't care for the technicalities of how much and I'll probably forget the exact meaning instantly. If you know a diatonic scale refers to a natural major scale and it's notes it's good enough.
    Why it's not just called the Major scale? Kind of strange got all these different names for it. :D Diatonic, Heptatonic, Panasonic xD
     
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    carlosmqr

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    I started playing in 2019 I believe March or something, so will be 2 years in a couple months...just recently theory started to make a bit more sense to me, but I just know basic stuff actually!
    Most of this time as been learning songs from tabs and try to get the technique better!
     

    chris_is_cool

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    Why it's not just called the Major scale? Kind of strange got all these different names for it. :D Diatonic, Heptatonic, Panasonic xD
    Well, natural minor is just as much the diatonic scale, just with a different starting point of the sequence (Major is whole-whole-half-whole-whole-whole-half, natural minor is whole-half-whole-whole-half-whole-whole). As are the other modes of the scale, in fact. So for me, calling it the diatonic scale just emphasizes that it is one scale/sequence of intervalls, from which 7 completely different sounding scales/modes are born, only one of them sounds like THE major scale. 😁
     
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    William B.

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    Well, natural minor is just as much the diatonic scale, just with a different starting point of the sequence (Major is whole-whole-half-whole-whole-whole-half, natural minor is whole-half-whole-whole-half-whole-whole). As are the other modes of the scale, in fact. So for me, calling it the diatonic scale just emphasizes that it is one scale/sequence of intervalls, from which 7 completely different sounding scales/modes are born, only one of them sounds like THE major scale. 😁
    Thanks guys, I think I got it, but won't remember off the top of my head if someone asked. So what I understand is all scales are 7 notes total and each scale has 7 modes? If that's how many modes there are, I haven't got into them deep enough yet.

    Reading things repeatedly and with different words kind of gets things across, repetition xD
    Reminds me of trying to learn to play video games
     
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    chris_is_cool

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    So what I understand is all scales are 7 notes total and each scale has 7 modes? If that's how many modes there are, I haven't got into them deep enough yet.
    Well, lets just say the most important scales of western music have 7 notes. Of course that's not all there is in music in general. But yes, a scale with 7 notes gives you 7 modes, each with a different "tonal center". Im still super early in my journey of really learning them as well, as in, really creating melodies and music with them instead of just talking about them. :ROFLMAO:
     
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    William B.

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    Well, lets just say the most important scales of western music have 7 notes. Of course that's not all there is in music in general. But yes, a scale with 7 notes gives you 7 modes, each with a different "tonal center". Im still super early in my journey of really learning them as well, as in, really creating melodies and music with them instead of just talking about them. :ROFLMAO:
    I went by the school here and asked some questions, they expect you to know theory, name, read sheet music, and already be able to play and sing the notes. I think you got a lot of the entry requirements ready if you were to attend. I just want to be in a band :D

    Btw the modes only change one note in the scale?
     
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    Ids Schiere

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    I went by the school here and asked some questions, they expect you to know theory, name, read sheet music, and already be able to play and sing the notes. I think you got a lot of the entry requirements ready if you were to attend. I just want to be in a band :D

    Btw the modes only change one note in the scale?
    Modes don't change notes, they change the order of the notes a and therefore the piece of music has a different tone center.
     
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    Devilreaper

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    I have been playing guitar for 42 years now and about 8 years ago was forced to relearn most of what I knew due to a traumatic brain injury and constantly have to keep relearning as I forget in addition have insane amounts of repetition to remember new things so if I can keep learning new things anyone of you can and I am very proud to have found this community and look forward to getting to know all you.