• Having issues viewing lessons?

    We're currently experiencing an issue with the video system we use and will get this fixed soon!

Name this chord ūü§ü

Chris Johnston

Music Theory Bragger
  • Nov 11, 2019
    670
    7
    1,715
    28
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    14
    Hey guys, so I was just watching a video of a friend showing his new music & he described a chord he played simply as a 'C minor' - however the exact voicing of notes he played were: C F# G Eb- which sounded amazing - but not strictly a C minor chord, or even strictly from the C minor scale. If you ignore the F#, its C minor, but if you ignore the G and think of the F# as Gb its Diminished - but you can't ignore anything ūüėā

    The full chord progression to give context was : G, C, G, ("C minor")

    With the intervals R #4 5 b3- I had the idea of calling it a Lydian b3 chord (4th Mode in G Harmonic Major)

    I'm wondering if anyone else has any ideas or if I'm missing anything?

    Cheers!
     

    Ids Schiere

    Sold-out Crowd Surfer
    Nov 11, 2019
    5,337
    6,747
    Groningen
    11
    Personally I like start chord names off by means of basic triads and in this case there's a basic Cm triad with the root, the minor third and the fifth. Since we typically name chords based on the root, the third and the fifth the F# would probably be an #11 for me making it an Cm#11.

    Take into account that the only time you name something a 4 or a second it's a SUS chord otherwise you typically use 9 or 11 (like you count from after the fifth of bother the third and the fifth are present) at least that's how I always understood it
     
    • Like
    Reactions: Chris Johnston

    Chris Johnston

    Music Theory Bragger
  • Nov 11, 2019
    670
    7
    1,715
    28
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    14
    Personally I like start chord names off by means of basic triads and in this case there's a basic Cm triad with the root, the minor third and the fifth. Since we typically name chords based on the root, the third and the fifth the F# would probably be an #11 for me making it an Cm#11.

    Take into account that the only time you name something a 4 or a second it's a SUS chord otherwise you typically use 9 or 11 (like you count from after the fifth of bother the third and the fifth are present) at least that's how I always understood it

    Personally I like start chord names off by means of basic triads and in this case there's a basic Cm triad with the root, the minor third and the fifth. Since we typically name chords based on the root, the third and the fifth the F# would probably be an #11 for me making it an Cm#11.

    Take into account that the only time you name something a 4 or a second it's a SUS chord otherwise you typically use 9 or 11 (like you count from after the fifth of bother the third and the fifth are present) at least that's how I always understood it
    Cmin#11 makes sense for sure ūüĎĆ Yeah you're absolutely right regarding the naming as #11 rather than #4, as you're dealing with Upper Extensions to a chord
     
    • Like
    Reactions: Ed Seith