Beginner Soloing using arpeggios and scales in the same key

Beginner Theory

Ids Schiere

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This is mostly for @Ominous but I figured I'd make a forum topic on it for everyone to see because you know he/she can't be the only one for whom this is helpful.

Basically, the place to start is knowing your chord families and scales. So let's take for example the key of C. You have the C major scale (C D E F G A B C) which gives you the basic triads C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am and Bdim for example.

An arpeggio really is a broken chord so you play each of the notes in the chord separately. I.e.
C - C E G
Dm - D F A
Em - E G B
F - F A C
G - G B D
Am - A C E
B - B F D

How to use these in a solo it really in it's most basic ways by playing the arpeggio over the chord so C arpeggio over a C chord, Dm arpeggio over a Dm etc.

However, that's a little bit boring so to add some spice to it you my want to start on the E instead of the C(one of my favorites) or start on the G instead of the C when you play over the C. But that's still faulty basic. You can also add notes, for example you can play Cmaj9(add a D(and B)) Cmaj7(add a B), Csus2(replace the E for a D), Csus4(replace the E for an F), Cmaj11(add an F(and B)) arpeggios over a C. You can even play a relative minor arpeggio over the major chord(or relative major over the minor) which in this case would be Am over the C making it more resembling of a C6 arpeggio and is another one I like to use sometimes.

For scales what you really want to try to do is use the scales that you know fit over the chord or the whole chord progression. A scale effectively is a collection of notes you know work over a chord (progression)(some sound better to and on than others but overall each note gives a certain vibe) and that's how you can decide which one you want to use. It can be any of the major modes over a C major chord for example. The most important aspect would be to not just play the scale up and down because nobody wants to hear you practice a scale when you play a solo(we do want to hear you practice a scale on the school tho). Try to be melodic, create a motif, skip notes every once in a while etc.

I figured I'd not go too deep, if you have any questions feel free to ask!
 

William Byerley

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    This is mostly for @Ominous but I figured I'd make a forum topic on it for everyone to see because you know he/she can't be the only one for whom this is helpful.

    Basically, the place to start is knowing your chord families and scales. So let's take for example the key of C. You have the C major scale (C D E F G A B C) which gives you the basic triads C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am and Bdim for example.

    An arpeggio really is a broken chord so you play each of the notes in the chord separately. I.e.
    C - C E G
    Dm - D F A
    Em - E G B
    F - F A C
    G - G B D
    Am - A C E
    B - B F D

    How to use these in a solo it really in it's most basic ways by playing the arpeggio over the chord so C arpeggio over a C chord, Dm arpeggio over a Dm etc.

    However, that's a little bit boring so to add some spice to it you my want to start on the E instead of the C(one of my favorites) or start on the G instead of the C when you play over the C. But that's still faulty basic. You can also add notes, for example you can play Cmaj9(add a D(and B)) Cmaj7(add a B), Csus2(replace the E for a D), Csus4(replace the E for an F), Cmaj11(add an F(and B)) arpeggios over a C. You can even play a relative minor arpeggio over the major chord(or relative major over the minor) which in this case would be Am over the C making it more resembling of a C6 arpeggio and is another one I like to use sometimes.

    For scales what you really want to try to do is use the scales that you know fit over the chord or the whole chord progression. A scale effectively is a collection of notes you know work over a chord (progression)(some sound better to and on than others but overall each note gives a certain vibe) and that's how you can decide which one you want to use. It can be any of the major modes over a C major chord for example. The most important aspect would be to not just play the scale up and down because nobody wants to hear you practice a scale when you play a solo(we do want to hear you practice a scale on the school tho). Try to be melodic, create a motif, skip notes every once in a while etc.

    I figured I'd not go too deep, if you have any questions feel free to ask!
    Is it possible to play any of those arpeggios over any of those chords? B-C-E- over Dm for example? They are all in the C major scale why I thought that.
     

    Calvin Phillips

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    Is it possible to play any of those arpeggios over any of those chords? B-C-E- over Dm for example? They are all in the C major scale why I thought that.
    You could do it in intervals. You could play really any arpeggio over any chord if you follow the same progression as the chords do. As long as the patterns match up it'll sound somewhat right.
     
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    Ids Schiere

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    Is it possible to play any of those arpeggios over any of those chords? B-C-E- over Dm for example? They are all in the C major scale why I thought that.
    If you do B C E it's most likely a Cmaj7 so you can play that I've a C major very comfortably. However, you do preferably want it to correspond some notes. So over Dm it is going to sound extremely out since you're playing the sixth, minor seventh and major second which aren't in the Dm chord itself. However you can try B C E over both Em and Am just fine.
     
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