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Theoretical Key???

Meezy Chaos

Free Bird Player
Apr 8, 2022
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Cincinnati
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So I was messing around in BandLab today with the AI generator and the project was generated in G# Major. I have a notebook full of the notes and chords for scales but I haven't done the # scales yets so i googled it and it came up with this: "G-Sharp major is a theoretical key based on the musical note G#, consisting of the pitches G#, A#, B#, C#, D#, E#, and F" I was taught in class that B# and E# don't exist, so how would they be in G# Major?
 
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Solution
Great topic Meezy!

The G# Major Scale is the same scale (to the ear) as the Ab Major Scale - it's all depending on how you choose to spell it.

Ab Major: Ab Bb C Db Eb F G

As you can see, Ab is much easier to spell as there are no B#'s (really C) and no E#'s (really F).

The only difference between G# Major and Ab Major is how you 'Theoretically' spell them. And G# Major happens as a result of using '#' spelling instead of 'b' spelling.

So really if you take any flat key and try to spell it with sharps (or vice versa) you should get it's Theoretical Equivalent 😊 A Theoritical Key is any key that has a Double Sharp or Double Flat( G# Maj has the F double Sharp)

It's all just a fun way to think of things though really - you really...

Chris Johnston

Music Theory Bragger
  • Nov 11, 2019
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    Great topic Meezy!

    The G# Major Scale is the same scale (to the ear) as the Ab Major Scale - it's all depending on how you choose to spell it.

    Ab Major: Ab Bb C Db Eb F G

    As you can see, Ab is much easier to spell as there are no B#'s (really C) and no E#'s (really F).

    The only difference between G# Major and Ab Major is how you 'Theoretically' spell them. And G# Major happens as a result of using '#' spelling instead of 'b' spelling.

    So really if you take any flat key and try to spell it with sharps (or vice versa) you should get it's Theoretical Equivalent 😊 A Theoritical Key is any key that has a Double Sharp or Double Flat( G# Maj has the F double Sharp)

    It's all just a fun way to think of things though really - you really dont want to be that guy who describes Afterlife as being in 'C## minor' 😂 The Theoretical Key exists but it's just not practical to think of the Notes/Chord names in that way.

    Ps. This kinda shows how the AI can generate something that is technically correct to describe but can be impractical for a real world human etc👌

    Hope this helps!
     
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    Chris Johnston

    Music Theory Bragger
  • Nov 11, 2019
    670
    7
    1,715
    28
    North Ayrshire, Scotland
    14
    Thank you so much for explaining this, I should have known better than to look at Wikipedia for a reference :ROFLMAO: The b and # thing always screwed with me in band class and i guess it carries on the tradition of screwing with me now that the semester is over haha.
    Haha, no worries! I looked up Wikipedia to double check the Definition so it has its uses 😂 Yeah the # b spelling can be confusing at first. There was a video/practice technique that helped me get it, I'll find it and post it in this thread for you 👌
     
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