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Performing Live

Wally

Campfire Attention Holder
  • Sep 27, 2020
    139
    352
    Michigan City, IN
    7
    So I’ve recently made the decision to start playing some songs live and I’m wondering if there’s anything that might be a must have when it comes to equipment? I’m not expecting my first few shows to be perfect but I at least want the songs to sound good. I’ll be performing by myself and will be performing the rhythm sections to the backing tracks of some of my favorite songs. The main scenery I’ll be hitting up will be smaller gigs at bars and open mic nights for starters. I have a 75 watt Fender Mustang amp but there’s gotta be more that I should bring in terms of sound. Like I said I know I’m not going to be perfect but I at least want the music to sound good and I know very little about sound.
     
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    Sinisnuthear

    Campfire Attention Holder
    Nov 11, 2019
    60
    79
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    Under purgatory
    www.soundcloud.com
    10
    Basic list:

    stereo PA system with portable live mixer

    Camera or something to record your live sessions—always record live sessions especially when you’re with your band

    a microphone for each instrument

    wireless port for guitar and bass—this one isn’t completely necessary but you’ll find out how weird it feels to not have one if you have used one

    for the mixer I would get a decent 8 track. That has USB, quarter inch, headphone jac
     
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    Ed Seith

    Supreme Galactic Overlord
    Staff member
    Legend+
  • Nov 11, 2019
    3,287
    8
    5,531
    51
    Marana, AZ USA
    soundcloud.com
    35
    I wrote this list for another site. Most of it will be applicable to any situation:

    Don't put fresh strings on right before the gig. You will have tuning problems.

    No one is going to hear your mistakes unless you REALLY fuck up bad. If you've practiced a lot, alone and with your band, you won't. Don't sweat it. Move along.

    The drummer sets the tempo. EVERYONE follow the drummer.

    Make eye contact with your audience as much as you can.

    Smile. Unless it's death metal. Then grin satanically.

    Move around the stage, as much as the stage size and equipment (cables) will allow. Interact with your bandmates.

    ENJOY IT.

    Those last four items are about PUTTING ON A SHOW. That's why Iron Maiden is legendary and no one wants to see Seether more than once, no matter how many cool songs they have.

    Bring extra. Picks, strings, guitar, if possible. Cables. Batteries.

    Once the sound guy drops his mic at your speaker and dials in your sound on the board, LEAVE YOUR FUCKING VOLUME ALONE.

    Days before the gig, make sure levels between patches, etc, are correct. This should have been ironed out in practice (proper volume difference between clean sounds, rhythm, and lead channels, etc.), but if not, get that shit going.

    Have a set list, know your time limit. If you have a 20 minute set, choose 18 minutes of material. Nothing sucks worse than a sound guy shutting you down in the middle of the last song. Decide which songs, if any, the singer will banter in between. This is usually the singer's call, but try to know what to expect.

    Do yourself a favor, and slip the sound guy a $10 or a $20 before the show, and thank him in advance for doing his best for you.

    Don't be a dick to ANYONE. Except maybe the singer, but not until AFTER the gig.

    After you stow your gear in a safe place after loadout, go back into the club and mingle. Be accessible. If someone offers some criticism, listen carefully - this is your audience telling you how you did. If someone's a dick about it, still listen, then thank them and tell them you'll try to do better and hope they'll come see you again.

    And then to add something from Papa Gates, bring some "fuck you" to the stage with you. For confidence and showmanship. You BELONG there, dammit. Act like it.
     

    Wally

    Campfire Attention Holder
  • Sep 27, 2020
    139
    352
    Michigan City, IN
    7
    I wrote this list for another site. Most of it will be applicable to any situation:

    Don't put fresh strings on right before the gig. You will have tuning problems.

    No one is going to hear your mistakes unless you REALLY fuck up bad. If you've practiced a lot, alone and with your band, you won't. Don't sweat it. Move along.

    The drummer sets the tempo. EVERYONE follow the drummer.

    Make eye contact with your audience as much as you can.

    Smile. Unless it's death metal. Then grin satanically.

    Move around the stage, as much as the stage size and equipment (cables) will allow. Interact with your bandmates.

    ENJOY IT.

    Those last four items are about PUTTING ON A SHOW. That's why Iron Maiden is legendary and no one wants to see Seether more than once, no matter how many cool songs they have.

    Bring extra. Picks, strings, guitar, if possible. Cables. Batteries.

    Once the sound guy drops his mic at your speaker and dials in your sound on the board, LEAVE YOUR FUCKING VOLUME ALONE.

    Days before the gig, make sure levels between patches, etc, are correct. This should have been ironed out in practice (proper volume difference between clean sounds, rhythm, and lead channels, etc.), but if not, get that shit going.

    Have a set list, know your time limit. If you have a 20 minute set, choose 18 minutes of material. Nothing sucks worse than a sound guy shutting you down in the middle of the last song. Decide which songs, if any, the singer will banter in between. This is usually the singer's call, but try to know what to expect.

    Do yourself a favor, and slip the sound guy a $10 or a $20 before the show, and thank him in advance for doing his best for you.

    Don't be a dick to ANYONE. Except maybe the singer, but not until AFTER the gig.

    After you stow your gear in a safe place after loadout, go back into the club and mingle. Be accessible. If someone offers some criticism, listen carefully - this is your audience telling you how you did. If someone's a dick about it, still listen, then thank them and tell them you'll try to do better and hope they'll come see you again.

    And then to add something from Papa Gates, bring some "fuck you" to the stage with you. For confidence and showmanship. You BELONG there, dammit. Act like it.
    You’re awesome Ed!
     
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    Ed Seith

    Supreme Galactic Overlord
    Staff member
    Legend+
  • Nov 11, 2019
    3,287
    8
    5,531
    51
    Marana, AZ USA
    soundcloud.com
    35
    I did have a number of sound guys thank me for being spot on with the post, but ALSO say that slipping them money isn't necessary and only the slimy ones would take it. That may be true, but I'd still offer the $10, and if it's refused, don't push. At that point, you've established your WILLINGNESS to take care of him and treat him well, and he will appreciate it.