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Guitar Improvisation

Solution
Hey @Lakshitaa - I made a quick video explaining what I mentioned above 😊
Here is a Google drive link to all the Major triad shapes (The last shape on the 3rd row has an intentional error that I leave for my students - the note on the b string should be on the g string):
I should point out that the numbers on the Major Triad shapes on the PDF indicate which fingers you should use to play them as Chords. The way to know which note in the triad is a Root, 3 or 5 is this:

Each pattern is from Low to High String (the direction of a down sweep)
Root position: R35
1st inversion: 35R
2nd Inversion: 5R3


Here's a link to the Minor triad shapes too (these are labeled better...

Rute Rodrigues

Campfire Attention Holder
  • Nov 11, 2019
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    Hello! Try to play «notes that aren't close to each other». That was one advice my mentor gave me some years ago. I hope it makes sense. At first it wont sound amazing but if you keep practicing, you'll eventually sound better.

    Also, make sure that you know which chord progression you're playing over. That way you can think about what notes you can use (use the notes that belong to the chord, also the 7th, 9th, etc).
    When I was younger I didnt know theory very well, so I tried to imagine the chords in my mind while improvising, and visualising in my head the notes that i could use in the different chords. And then trying to play not so obvious notes, and choosing interesting intervals.

    I'm not a great improviser either, but these are the things that people taught me over the last couple years.
    I'll leave you with a great video in my opinion, by Plini.

    But I'm interested to follow this thread and see what other people have to say as well, I could also use some advice.
     
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    Chris Johnston

    Music Theory Bragger
  • Nov 11, 2019
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    I need some help on learning how to solo to a chord progression. I try to use major and pentatonic scales, but just end up doing scale walks. Some advice to make my solos interesting would be much appreciated. Thanks.
    Great topic!

    I had this exact same frustration a few years back. The thing that completely changed my playing was learning how to use Major & Minor triads and their inversions all over the neck. I'll try and make a video this weekend explaining it and I'll upload it on here 👌

    The way it would work would be this:
    Say your soloing in the Key of C. You could use a C Major Triad (CEG) and then use a few simple patterns to the left and right of your Triad notes to access the other notes surrounding them in the Scale.

    So you're still playing the C Major Scale but you're forced to break away from the small Triad shape to find the other notes - this immediately diminished the 'scaler' habits in my playing.

    You could also do a more Jazz based approach and hop from Triad to Triad as the Chords in the key change, while doing the same thing mentioned above, and you'll get a different sound again.

    I'll try my best to get something uploaded to help 😊
     
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    Chris Johnston

    Music Theory Bragger
  • Nov 11, 2019
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    Hey @Lakshitaa - I made a quick video explaining what I mentioned above 😊
    Here is a Google drive link to all the Major triad shapes (The last shape on the 3rd row has an intentional error that I leave for my students - the note on the b string should be on the g string):
    I should point out that the numbers on the Major Triad shapes on the PDF indicate which fingers you should use to play them as Chords. The way to know which note in the triad is a Root, 3 or 5 is this:

    Each pattern is from Low to High String (the direction of a down sweep)
    Root position: R35
    1st inversion: 35R
    2nd Inversion: 5R3


    Here's a link to the Minor triad shapes too (these are labeled better with the actual scale tones):
    The patterns for the Minor Shapes are:

    Root: 2 frets right, 2 frets left
    b3 : 2 frets right, 1 fret left
    5 : 1 fret right, 2 frets left

    ^ This will make more sense after you've seen the first video 😂

    Hope this helps! Fire away with any questions 👌
     
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    Solution

    Lakshitaa

    Stairway to Heaven Tab Studier
    Feb 20, 2023
    2
    2
    Hey @Lakshitaa - I made a quick video explaining what I mentioned above 😊
    Here is a Google drive link to all the Major triad shapes (The last shape on the 3rd row has an intentional error that I leave for my students - the note on the b string should be on the g string):
    I should point out that the numbers on the Major Triad shapes on the PDF indicate which fingers you should use to play them as Chords. The way to know which note in the triad is a Root, 3 or 5 is this:

    Each pattern is from Low to High String (the direction of a down sweep)
    Root position: R35
    1st inversion: 35R
    2nd Inversion: 5R3


    Here's a link to the Minor triad shapes too (these are labeled better with the actual scale tones):
    The patterns for the Minor Shapes are:

    Root: 2 frets right, 2 frets left
    b3 : 2 frets right, 1 fret left
    5 : 1 fret right, 2 frets left

    ^ This will make more sense after you've seen the first video 😂

    Hope this helps! Fire away with any questions 👌
    Tysm @Chris Johnston

    The Google document is really helpful, and this helps my progress a lot

    Cheers and thanks again 😃
     
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    Chris Johnston

    Music Theory Bragger
  • Nov 11, 2019
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    @Chris Johnston hey if the notes filled in more on the pictures would we then get the CAGED chords?
    Was wondering cause these are in 3.
    Thanks it's helpful for me
    Hey man, yeah that would make sense! These are like smaller manageable fragments of the Caged Shapes 👌
     
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    Costaguitar

    New Student
    Jul 15, 2023
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    Hey, Jazz Musician here. Im better at soloing on Trumpet but the language translates well.

    When you're soloing you want to mainly focus on hitting the Chord Tones. Chord Tones are just the notes that make up the chord that you're soloing over. So for a Aminor you'll want to focus on A (root), C (min3rd), E (fifth) and the minor or major 7th depending on the scale.

    In A harmonic minor for example the flat 7 will sound bad, and the major 7th will often sound much better. Same with flamenco, but depending on the chord a flat 7th can also work. So you have to be actively listening to the backing track and planning ahead after you outline all the chord tones.

    Your phrasing, over each chord change should be built around each chord tone. Synyster Gates abuses arpeggios (chord tones) in all of his solos and it sounds amazing.

    As you delve deeper scale work, diminished 5ths, 13/b13 , 9/b9, will spice up your playing.
     
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